About > News > News Coverage

NEWS COVERAGE


SA Property
Development of the month: Living in harmony in Natal - January 6, 2010
The Reeds at Balgowan exemplifies the spirit of "ubuntu living" with unique, enviro-sensitive homes built to be in harmony. Read more in the digital edition of this magazine on pp.24-25 Read more»»

 

YouStory.com

California Eco-Home Design Comes to South Africa - November 2009
The Reeds at Balgowan Blends Modern Californian Architechture with South African Enviroliving. New Eco-Estate Nature Reserve in KwaZulu-Natal Brings Bold, Enviro-Friendly Home Design to Sylvan Settings of Cherished Midlands Meander Near Michaelhouse. Read more»»

 

FM LIFE

Rude awakening in the Midlands - October 2006

The gentlefolk driving past the US-based developer Donovan Neale-May’s wildlife sanctuary in Balgowan might be forgiving for doing a double take. The last rays of the sun that never set on the British Empire seem at last to be fading from the KwaZulu-Natal midlands. This is because Neale-May has eschewed the de rigueur mock colonial or Georgian homes of the area for what the locals could interpret as a particularly complex drainage culvert or a farmer’s failed attempt at a concrete barn. But Neale-May has introduced serious modernist architecture to his nine-unit development, The Reeds at Balgowan, on a 45 ha uKhahlamba-Drakensberg World Heritage Site of which it is a part. Neale-May runs a successful international communications company, GlobalFluency, from Palo Alto, California, in the heart of Silicon Valley, and he has hired SA-raised Palo Alto architect Stan Field as lead designer of The Reeds’ units. Read more»»


Property24.com

Kzn's New Enviro-living Option - September 2006

Work has begun on a new eco-sensitive development project located in a pristine Kwazulu-Natal wildlife habitat just North of Howick in the Nottingham Road/Balgowan area. Called The Reeds at Balgowan, it consists of nine individually crafted homes designed by a prominent international architect, Stan Field, one of California's leading EnviroLiving advocates.


Cape Argus

Eco-Sensitive Residential Project Starts in Pristine KZN Wildlife Habitat - November 2006

Work has begun on a new eco-sensitive development project in a pristine KwaZulu-Natal wildlife habitat just north of Howick in the Nottingham Road/Balgowan area. The Reeds at Balgowan consists of nine homes designed by architect Stan Field of California. Field is a past winner of the SA Institute of Architects' Award of Merit and the Reeds at Balgowan had been recognized for concept innovation by the American Institute of Architects. Read more»»


Journal of the KwaZulu-Natal Institute for Architecture:

Ubuntu, Where the Spirit of the Place is Expressed Through the Architecture"

Situated in the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands in the vicinity of Nottingham Road, the site occupies some 50 hectares of pristine undeveloped land. The land had been acquired from a local farmer whose wise stewardship had maintained its intrinsic qualities. A valley basin fed by an underground spring had been formed into two dams, which are surrounded by indigenous forests of Yellowwood and Stinkwood together with Pine forests, interspersed with clusters of Eucalyptus groves, the remaining African grassland between.


The Quill

Eco-sensitive Estate for the Midlands - June 2006

The Midlands' pristine environment is frequently perceived as being under threat by those opposed to mass residential and commercial developments. Now, south of Nottingham Road near Balgowan, an ecosensitive residential development is aiming to show that development and ecology can exist side-by-side.


San Mateo County Times

Design Matters! Shows the art of architecture - June 2006

The Midlands' pristine environment is frequently perceived as being under threat by those opposed to mass residential and commercial developments. Now, south of Nottingham Road near Balgowan, an ecosensitive residential development is aiming to show that development and ecology can exist side-by-side.

 

About Stan Field, his architecture and vision:


Magazine cover

SF Magazine

Heading South on Highway 1, halfway between Half Moon Bay and Pescadero, Stan Field, architect and sexagenarian son of the African bush, is struggling to describe what it was like to venture into the wilderness as a child. “It’s difficult to talk about that while being here, surrounded
by this,” he confesses, motioning to the surroundings from the passenger seat. Because his longish, shaggy hair is now gray, and his blue eyes are aided by round spectacles, Field simultaneously conveys the youthfulness of a lifelong surfer and the air of an erudite professor. In either mode, he has trouble concentrating when he has landscape to study. After he veers into another site-based discussion of the Northern California landscape, a bend in the road reveals a golden peninsula whose crisp edges seem recently shorn off by a glacier, and his focus is broken again. “Look at that—beautiful!” he bursts, as the waters of the Pacific shimmer below long cliffs. Read more»»

 

Magazine cover

The Robb Report Collection

Stan Field - November 2006

For more than 30 years, Stan Field has carved his architectural initials into the landscape of three continents, with original designs that manage to simultaneously blend into their sites and stand out as extraordinary. Each of Stan Field's structures tell a story. From his very first project — a study of walls — he was intrigued by "what the built form meant in the natural landscape," the whole idea of taking materials and directing something. This fascination has resulted in the desire — and ability — to create individualistic, avant garde architecture. His vision has created such local stand-outs as the "super-Eichler" in Old Palo Alto — a wave of stucco with a steel wing, two buildings connected by light. Read more»»

 

Magazine Cover

Palo Alto Weekly

Breaking Ground - Architect Stan Field Provokes Palo Alto's Adventurous Spirit - January 2006

For more than 30 years, Stan Field has carved his architectural initials into the landscape of three continents, with original designs that manage to simultaneously blend into their sites and stand out as extraordinary. Each of Stan Field's structures tell a story. From his very first project — a study of walls — he was intrigued by "what the built form meant in the natural landscape," the whole idea of taking materials and directing something. This fascination has resulted in the desire — and ability — to create individualistic, avant garde architecture. His vision has created such local stand-outs as the "super-Eichler" in Old Palo Alto — a wave of stucco with a steel wing, two buildings connected by light. Read more»»